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Mediavine Review (How I Made the Switch from AdSense and Increased Revenue)

Earlier this year I switched one of my websites from AdSense to Mediavine.

You may or may not have heard of Mediavine before, but in a nutshell, they manage and optimize ads on your website, exclusively. They do it such that monthly revenue is as high as possible while maintaining the best user experience.

Display advertising with Mediavine is very much hands-off. All you need to do, is install a little WordPress plugin and ads will be displayed on a lazy-loading basis.

This Mediavine review takes you through the process of applying, getting accepted and setting up your website. I will also shed some light on how my site has performed in the last few months since joining, and I will share the pros and cons of being a Mediavine publisher.

Update October 2018:
 
I have decided to move a second website over to Mediavine. This second website attracts significantly more traffic than the first one, but I have been hesitant to make the switch because my results with AdSense for this second website have been amazing. But there is only one way to find out if Mediavine can get better results and that is by making the switch.
 
The site has already been approved and I will keep a close eye on RPM and income and compare the numbers to what I had with AdSense. To be continued!
 
 
 

Who Is Mediavine?

Okay, so who or what is Mediavine?

According to their Twitter bio, Mediavine is a group of publishers banded together working directly with the ad exchanges and advertisers to get top dollar for their ad inventory and sponsored work.

In other words, Mediavine takes care of programmatic display advertising on people’s websites and blogs. They do this exclusively, which means that once you’ve signed up with Mediavine, you will need to remove all your current ads (usually Google AdSense ads) from your site.

This is actually a good thing, because it simply means that as a Mediavine publisher you can focus on publishing good content. You don’t have to worry about managing ads on your site anymore as Mediavine will take care of all that.

Mediavine Publisher Network

Mediavine has also been an Internet publisher since 2004. They own and operate several high traffic websites, such as The Hollywood Gossip and Food Fanatic, and some of their staff run their own blogs as well.

Name Change

They changed their name earlier in 2018, from Mediavine Publisher Network to simply Mediavine. They did this because they didn’t want to identify themselves as an ad network anymore.

Mediavine is much more than that. Their genuine goal is to help build sustainable businesses for content creators like you and me.

Google Certified Publishing Partner

Last but not least, Mediavine is officially a Google Certified Publishing Partner. And that’s kind of a big thing because there aren’t many companies out there that can claim that certification status.

To become a Google Certified Publishing Partner, an advertising company will have to meet strict qualification standards to prove that they are specialists in Google’s ad products.

Mediavine has also demonstrated excellent customer satisfaction with high ad viewability rates and a strong focus on mobile-first and video technology.

In short, Mediavine is on top of their game when it comes to programmatic display advertising.

 

Getting Started with Mediavine

Let’s go through the steps of setting up your website with Mediavine.

1. Mediavine Requirements

To be accepted with Mediavine, your blog needs to be in good standing with Google and will need to have had at least 25K sessions in the last 30 days. Sessions, not page views.

The main reason behind these requirements is that advertisers need to be assured that the traffic websites are sending to them via Mediavine is engaged, high-quality, and worth bidding on. Makes sense.

So if you can meet these requirements, go ahead and apply by submitting their online application form on the Mediavine website.

2. Approval

Once you’ve submitted your site, you will receive a confirmation email. In this email, Mediavine will ask you to run an analytics report so that they can do an initial verification of your traffic before moving on to the next step.

If the traffic report shows no issues, Mediavine will start the application process for their network partners on your behalf. You will also need to be approved as a partner within Mediavine’s Google AdExchange, which you have to activate yourself.

Once all the approvals are sorted, you will receive an official email from Mediavine stating that your application has been approved! Next they will ask you to sign the contract online, and once all the paperwork has been completed, it’s time to start the on-boarding process.

3. Preparing Your Website for Launch

Mediavine will now have a closer look at your website to see if there are any potential issues. Your site needs to be mobile responsive and needs to have a sidebar that is wide enough to display ads with a width of 300 pixels.

If Mediavine finds issues, you can either make style or code changes in your site yourself to resolve these issues, or you can have Mediavine do it for you.

If you don’t have technical skills or if you don’t have the time for it, simply create a WordPress admin account for Mediavine and one of their engineers will take care of it and report back to you once completed.

Once your site is technically ready for ads to be displayed, you will get access to your Mediavine dashboard where you need to configure a few things, such as privacy policy and payment settings.

You will then need to install the script wrapper (that magically generates all the ads in your site) which you can easily do via the lightweight Mediavine WordPress plugin.

4. Exclusivity

Joining Mediavine means you cannot have other ads on your site. Therefore, the very last step in the preparation process is removing ads that you currently have in your site.

For most websites these will be ads provided by Google AdSense. Simply delete all instances of ad scripts and you’re good to go. Amazon’s native ads are still allowed.

5. Lift-Off!

All done? Let Mediavine know and they will activate the ads on your site!

One important thing to point out here is that Mediavine wants you to maintain their five standard ad placements for at least 90 days after on-boarding. This allows advertisers to learn your site, and your readers to get acquainted with your new ads.

Also, from this point on, you will receive a series of emails from Mediavine, explaining more about their network, how things work and how to optimize your website for the best possible financial outcome. Very helpful!

 
 

The Mediavine Dashboard

Your personal Mediavine dashboard allows you to configure ad settings on your blog, analyze RPM numbers, check your income and so much more.

A big feature in the Mediavine dashboard is the site health check. This is a reflection of how well your site is optimized for ads, presented in different colors with red being not-so-good and teal being awesome. The saying “go for teal” is a thing within the Mediavine community!

Mediavine provides lots of tips around how to best optimize your site such that you can achieve those teal color ratings. I do keep an eye on it, but personally I am not too worried about the site health check. In the Facebook group though, this feature is quite a hot topic.

Mediavine dashboard

One of the most important features in the dashboard is the ad settings. Here you can configure what type of ads you’d like to allow in your site and on which devices you’d like them displayed.

You can also set the in-content ad frequency as a percentage on desktop as well as on mobile. This is very useful as it allows you to tone things down a bit if you feel that there are too many ads appearing on your blog.

Drawbacks

As fancy as the Mediavine dashboard is, I find that it falls a bit short when it comes to detailed reporting and analysis. I’m a numbers guy and I love digging into things, analyzing and continuously improving results based on data.

I would love to see more detailed page- and ad-level data to see how well ads and pages are performing. Stats such as RPM per page and ad revenue per traffic source are invaluable as it allows you to see what works well and what doesn’t work so well.

I would also love to run detailed tests just like you can do with AdSense, but with Mediavine there are limits to what you can do in this regard.

Having said that, the average Mediavine publisher typically doesn’t mind this at all. For most bloggers, the current dashboard is advanced enough. Bloggers typically prefer to focus on publishing content and to let Mediavine take care of the display advertising bit. And that’s fair enough.

 
 

RPM, Revenue and Payments

So how has my site performed since joining Mediavine a few months ago? Let me share a few numbers with you.

RPM and Revenue

It’s only been a few months (at the time of writing), so it’s too early to make hard judgements, but so far the results have been quite promising.

What is RPM? It stands for Revenue per Mille. In other words, the money you make per 1,000 visitors, sessions or page views.

Session RPM = Income / Sessions * 1000
 

The session RPM for my site has been hovering around the $14, $15 mark. From what I gather in the Facebook group, this appears to be a pretty average RPM, nothing out of the ordinary.

It very much depends on the niche your site is in. There are also sites that can achieve an RPM of $20 or even higher. My site lives in a very broad niche, which makes it harder to achieve above average ad revenue.

I won’t give you exact revenue numbers for the site that I have on-boarded, but it is definitely higher than I was getting via Google AdSense.

But to give you an idea, if you have a site that attracts 50,000 sessions each month, your monthly ad revenue would be $750 based on a 15$ RPM. Similarly, if you can achieve a $20 RPM, your revenue would be $1,000.

Not bad at all!

How is Mediavine Able to Achieve More Revenue?

Mediavine uses lazy-loading technology to display ads which increases overall viewability. And that leads to more revenue.

Another reason why RPM and revenue are quite high for Mediavine publishers is because of the sticky ads in the sidebar and at the bottom of each page. These adhesion units, as they are called, tend to perform really well.

Mediavine review

What’s great is that Mediavine gives you, the publisher, a lot of tips on how to improve RPM. Things like publishing long-form content, more images and shorter paragraphs can all contribute to a higher RPM and increased ad revenue.

Payments

Show me the money!

Mediavine pays on or before the 5th of each month. Payments are on a NET 65 basis which means you get paid 65 days after the end of a given month. For example, revenue earned in January will hit your PayPal account in April.

As a publisher, you will receive 75% of the total monthly revenue, and Mediavine will keep 25%. There is a loyalty bonus scheme, which means you’ll receive a bigger share of the revenue the longer you stay on as a Mediavine publisher.

Mediavine publisher payments

 
 
 

Mediavine Facebook Group

If you’re a Mediavine publisher, you’re allowed into their very lively Facebook group. Only if you want to, of course. The group currently has over 2K members and has a strong community atmosphere. The moderators, mostly Mediavine employees, are also very helpful and responsive.

The problem with this Facebook group though is that it’s become a bit of a victim of its own success. A lot of random things are being posted, unrelated to Mediavine or advertising.

Some people go to this group as soon as they have an issue with their blog or if they have a random SEO or Pinterest question. And in most of these cases, they will actually get helpful feedback.

Mediavine publishers Facebook group

That is great, but if you’re expecting to easily find Mediavine specific and/or advertising related information here, then you may be disappointed. The info certainly is there, it just tends to get buried under all these other, often unrelated posts and updates.

But well done to Mediavine for creating such a vibrant and supportive Facebook group. It shows how much they care about customer service and keeping everyone happy.

They also do regular Facebook live videos where you can ask anything you like. Very helpful indeed!

 
 

Mediavine vs AdSense

So what exactly are the differences between Mediavine and AdSense?

Google AdSense is essentially an ad network, whereas Mediavine is an ad manager. Mediavine works with several ad networks and partners to serve ads on their publisher websites. One of these partners is Google AdExchange, a premium version of Google AdSense.

Mediavine lets all of these networks and partners compete with one another for advertising space on publisher websites. The better the website, the more advertisers are willing to bid on advertising space.

The Technical Side of Things

With AdSense, all you need to do is add a piece of code in your content where you want an ad to appear. This can be in the sidebar, in your blog posts, in the header, pretty much anywhere you like.

With Mediavine it’s a lot easier and a lot less work. Instead of adding pieces of code throughout your content, with Mediavine the only thing you need to do is install a script wrapper once and Mediavine’s system will make ads appear in your blog.

They do so on a lazy-loading basis, which means ads will only load when they are viewable. More ads start appearing as a reader scrolls through an article.

It’s worth pointing out here that the Mediavine dashboard allows you to configure ad density. So if you feel that there are too many ads appearing in your site, you can tone this down a bit, or vice versa.

You can also choose to manage Mediavine ads the way you manage AdSense ads by using ad short codes. This way you will have full control over where ads are appearing throughout your content.

 
 

Mediavine Pros and Cons

To summarize this Mediavine review, let me go through the pros and cons of being a Mediavine publisher. Please note though that these pros and cons are based on my personal experience so far.

Pros:

  • Mediavine provides excellent customer service and support. It’s very obvious that this is embedded in their company policy. If you have any questions, you can shoot them an email, and they will always respond in a friendly and timely manner.
     
  • They are innovative. Mediavine uses advanced technologies such as lazy-loading to achieve the best possible user experience and ad revenue. They also provide fancy tools such as the Mediavine Video Player to further increase ad performance.
     
  • Mediavine is proactive in the sense that they are very much willing to have a critical look at an individual site to see if there are ways to improve RPM and increase revenue.
     
  • The ads that I’ve seen on my site and other Mediavine sites appear to be relevant and good quality. This is of course very important from a user experience perspective.
     
  • Both the RPM and revenue are good, absolutely better than with AdSense. I have yet to meet someone who is able to achieve a better RPM with AdSense than they can with Mediavine.
     
  • You can fine-tune ad settings such that they are a better fit for your site. You can change the percentage of ads shown, you can exclude certain types of ads, and much more.
     
  • Mediavine gives you full control over where ads are shown by using specific short codes. It can happen that ads show up in places where you don’t want them to show up. Or sometimes they can interfere with the layout/structure of an article. In these cases it’s a good idea to use these short codes so you can decide yourself where ads should appear.

Cons:

  • I personally find that the dashboard reporting is a bit limited in what it can do. I’d love to drill down on performance per page and see exactly how well certain ads are performing on different pages. Google AdSense is definitely a lot more advanced in that regard. In all fairness though, the Mediavine dashboard as a whole is probably sophisticated enough for most publishers.
     
  • The Facebook group is a bit scattered. As I mentioned above, the group has become a victim of its own success. But that’s only how I am experiencing the group though, others may find the group a great place to hang out and share their blogging experiences. The moderators are also doing an excellent job addressing people’s questions.
  • Payments can only be processed via PayPal. Update: In September 2018, Mediavine switched over to a new payment provider and they are now finally able to offer direct bank deposits and other payment options in addition to PayPal, for US based as well as for non-US based publishers. Yay!
     

Use TransferWise

If you’re a non-US blogger like me and you don’t want to lose money on PayPal’s fees and exchange rates, then be like me and open a TransferWise account. If you’re not familiar with TransferWise, they are basically very similar to PayPal except that they don’t charge those crazy fees.

So what I do is simple. In my payment settings in the Mediavine dashboard, I request for my revenue to be deposited in my US bank account associated with my TransferWise account. This carries no fees.

Once I have received the funds in my TransferWise USD account, I transfer it to my local AUD bank with very minimal fees and excellent exchange rates. It works great!

 
 
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Final Thoughts

Hopefully this Mediavine review has given you some useful insights. The people behind Mediavine are bloggers themselves and have become experts in the huge industry that display advertising is.

The requirements to join as a Mediavine publisher are also very reasonable compared to some other ad management agencies.

So if you own a blog that consistently generates a good amount of traffic, I strongly recommend Mediavine as your ad manager. Your site will be in good hands.

 

Mediavine review

 
AJ Mens
 

I have been running an online business since 2015 and I am using Blog Pioneer to help you achieve financial success online.

Comments 13 comments
Joanne - Travel with Joanne - June 12, 2018

Thanks for this AJ. I’m nowhere near the required sessions but it is great to have Mediavine demystified.

Reply
    AJ Mens - June 12, 2018

    Glad you liked the article Joanne. Keep in mind though that if you can’t yet meet the Mediavine requirements, you can still make a good side income with Google AdSense.

    Reply
Tobias - July 22, 2018

Hi AJ, thanks for the Mediavine review and the tips on avoiding exchange rate fees! We’ve just started with Mediavine and are excited about the boost in revenue. But like you, I want to avoid the PayPal exchange rate fees. Can you tell me a bit more about how it works with TransferWise? Am I right in thinking:
1. You have a USD account with an Australian bank.
2. You withdraw money from your PayPal USD account straight into your USD Australian bank account.
3. You send money from your USD Australian bank account to TransferWise.
4. TransferWise sends AUD to your AUD Australian bank account.
Just trying to get it straight in my head. Thanks for your help!

Reply
    AJ Mens - July 22, 2018

    Hi Tobias, thanks for stepping by!

    It works slightly different. There is no need to have a local USD bank account. I receive the Mediavine revenue in USD in my PayPal account. From there I transfer the funds for free to my USD account in TransferWise. And from there I transfer the funds to my AUD bank account. TransferWise takes care of the conversion, and with great rates.

    Hope this helps!

    Reply
      Tobias - July 31, 2018

      Thanks AJ, that’s really helpful! The piece I was missing was that I didn’t realize it’s possible to transfer money directly from a USD Paypal account to a Transferwise account.

      Reply
        AJ Mens - July 31, 2018

        Good to hear Tobias! But you may have heard that Mediavine is moving to a new payment system, which means you can now skip PayPal and have Mediavine deposit your revenue directly into your TransferWise account.

        Reply
          Kk Ezekiel - August 8, 2018

          Hi AJ,

          Thanks for the detailed review, one of the only posts that actually goes through the whole Mediavine process and how to avoid the fees.

          I got accepted yesterday and I was wondering when the direct deposit option will be implemented.

          Reply
          AJ Mens - August 8, 2018

          Hi Kk, welcome to the Mediavine club!

          The new payment options should have been ready last month (July 2018) but due to issues with their third-party payment processor, Mediavine has had to postpone it.

          I am not sure when they will be ready but hopefully this month or otherwise next month.

          Reply
      Adnan - October 2, 2018

      I guess you should have used payoneer. They will give you US+UK+AU+Canadian+Chinese virtual bank account. I guess now you have the option to put your US bank account at mediavine, if not then you can send your paypal payment to payoneer bank account and from that either withdraw through their mastercard or your local bank account. They provide better rate than this transferwise

      Reply
        AJ Mens - October 2, 2018

        I actually find that with a TransferWise borderless account I get better rates than with Payoneer.

        Reply
Kk Ezekiel - August 14, 2018

Hi, could you tell me how you optimised your ads to increase your RPMs. For example, could you tell me about your ad frequency and ad spacing. Anything that you could give me would be great help.

Reply
    AJ Mens - August 14, 2018

    I actually use the Mediavine short codes to have full control over where the ads are shown, but the drawback is that this brings the RPM down. But otherwise, to increase RPM and revenue, it’s important to write in short paragraphs. Often paragraphs can be as short as one or two sentences. Using more images also helps, because it makes articles longer so more ads can be loaded if the reader keeps scrolling. Hope this helps!

    Reply
Kk Ezekiel - August 14, 2018

Thanks, that’s a great help!

Reply
 
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